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    Anodyne - Eases pain.
    Anthelmintic - Expels or destroys intestinal worms. 
    Antacid - Corrects acid conditions in stomach, blood and bowels. 
    Antibiotic - Inhibits growth and destroys viruses and bacteria.
    Anticatarrhal - Eliminates mucous conditions. 
    Antiemetic - Relieves stomach sickness; prevents vomiting. 
    Antipyretic - Reduces fevers also called a refrigerant. 
    Antilithic - Helps prevent the formation of gravel and stones.
    Antiseptic - Prevents the growth of bacteria. 
    Antispasmodic - Relieves convulsions and cramps. 
    Aperient - Mild laxative; softens stool without purging. 
    Aphrodisiac - Corrects impotence; balances sexual powers. 
    Aromatic - Has fragrant smell; agreeable pungent taste.
    Astringent - Increases tissue tone, firmness; contracts tissue. 

    Cardiac - Increases the power of the heart. 
    Carminative - Expels gas from the stomach, intestines, and bowels. 
    Cathartic - Causes rapid evacuation of the bowels. 


     

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Cholagogue - Promotes the flow of bile.
Condiment - Used to season foods and increase digestive activity.
Demulcent - Relieves internal inflammation gives protective coating.
Deobstruent - Overcomes obstructions; aperient. 
Diaphoretic - Increases perspiration; Stimulating - Neutral Relaxing. 
Discutient - Dissolves and removes tumors and abnormal growths. 
Diuretic Increases flow of urine; removes water from the body.
Emetic - Induces vomiting.
Emmenagogue - Promotes menstrual flow 
Emollient - Applied externally to soften and soothe skin. 
Expectorant - Removes mucous from nose, throat, lungs and bronchial passages.
Febrifuge - Reduces fever. 
Glactagogue - Promotes secretion of nursing milk.
Hemostatic - Stops internal bleeding or hemorrhaging. 
Hepatic - Strengthens, tones and stimulates liver secretions.

Laxative - Promotes bowel action; a mild purgative. 
Lithotriptic - Stimulates and cleanses the lymphatic system. 
Mucilaginous - Soothes inflammation. 

 

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Nervine - A tonic to the nervous system. 
Nutritive - Supplies substantial nutrients for building and toning.
Opthalmic - Heals diseases of the eye. 
Oxytocic - Assists labor and promotes easy childbirth. 
Parasiticide - Kills and removes parasites from the skin.
Pectorals - Helps relieve chest and respiratory problems. 
Purgative - Causes strong bowel movement. 
Rubefacient - Causes redness and increased blood supply to the skin. 
Sedative - Reduces excitement and nervous reactions. 
Sialagogue - Promotes increased flow of saliva.
Stimulant - Increases energy; quickens actions of the system.
Stomachic - Gives strength and tone to the stomach. 
Styptic - Contracts tissues or blood vessels; Checks bleeding. 
Tonic - Increases energy and systemic tone through nutrition.
Vermicide - Expels and destroys worms without expulsion from the bowels.
Vermifuge - Expels and destroys worms by expelling from the bowels, heals cuts, burns, and wounds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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    COLD INFUSION
    After pre-moistening, wrap one part herb (dry weight) in cloth and suspend it in 32 parts of water (by volume) at room temperature, overnight.
    Squeeze out the herb into the tea in the morning, and add enough water to bring it back to 32 parts.
    STANDARD INFUSION
    Boil 32 parts of water, remove from heat, and steep one part (by weight) of the herb in the water for 20-30 minutes.
    Strain, and pour sufficient water through the herb in the strainer to return the volume of tea to 32 parts.

 

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    STRONG DECOCTION
    Combine 32 parts of water with one part of herb (by weight), bring slowly to a boil, continue for ten minutes, cool until warm, and strain.
    Pour additional water through the herb to return the volume to 32.
    A WEAK DECOCTION is the same, but using half as much herb in the same volume of water.
    COMMENTS. Except for the weak decoction, the above teas end up with 30 mls having the constituents of a gram of herb. If the dosage recommends 120 mls of Strong Decoction, and you only want a single batch, use 4 grams of herb, or divide a gram of herb into eight equal parts and use one part for the tea. (Approximate only)
    DO NOT MAKE MORE THAN A DAY'S WORTH OF TEA AT ONE TIME.

 

 

 

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    EYEWASH and DOUCHE
    Make an isotonic water by adding a slightly rounded teaspoon of salt to a litre of clean water (1/4 teaspoon per cup), and make the tea with this solution as per the recommended strength.
    Make a fresh batch every 5-6 hours.
    FRESH PLANT TINCTURE
    One part by weight of the fresh, chopped herb is steeped for 7-10 days in two parts by volume of alcohol (190 proof or 95% ethanol), and pressed or squeezed out.
    There is no reason to blend or shake this maceration; the tincture is formed passively as a result of dehydration.
    Ethanol draws out all plant constituents that contain water, leaving only cellulose and dead tissue behind.
    DRY PLANT TINCTURE
    Maceration. If the Materia Medica calls for a [1:5, 60% alcohol] tincture, it means this: your solvent is 60% alcohol and 40% water (the water is presumed), and one part of herb by weight has been invested in five parts of solvent by volume.
    As to the terminology used by herbalists in this regard: The resulting solvent is called the 'Menstruum' and the remainder of the plant material left in the bottom is called the 'Marc'.
    Many thanks to Michael Moore for allowing us to use his 'rules of thumb'.

 

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Acid Indigestion Relief
Heartburn, Flatulence, Bloating, Hyperacidity, Indigestion, Poor Digestion, Belching, Gastritis
Combine:
1/2 tsp. Prunus mume leaves, powdered
1/2 tsp. Caraway seeds
1/4 tsp. Dill weed
1 cup hot water
Stir the herbs into the hot water and allow to stand for 10 minutes, covered. Strain off the caraway seeds and drink following meals or when needed.

 

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    Adrenal Tonic Tea
    Stress, Fatigue, Adrenal Deficiency, Athletic Endurance, Exhaustion
    Combine: 
    1 tsp. Ashwaganda Root
    1 tsp. Oat seed
    1 tsp. Hawthorn Berry
    1/2 tsp. Liquorice root
    3 cups water
    Bring the water to a boil. Place the dried herbs into the pot and turn the heat down to a simmer. Let simmer for 10 minutes, then strain the herbs and drink the tea cold or warmed, 3 times a day.

 

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    Allergy Tea
    Hay Fever, Allergies
    Combine: 
    1 tsp. Nettle leaf
    1/2 tsp. Eyebright 
    1/2 tsp Echinacea Root
    1/4 tsp. Liquorice root powder
    2 Jujube dates (Fresh or Dried)
    2 cups water
    Boil the water and pour it over the herbs and Jujube dates in a tea pot. Cover and allow to steep for 15-20 minutes. Strain the herbs and drink 3- 4 cups a day. The Jujube dates can be removed and eaten or added to warm cereal or other cooked dishes.

 

 

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  • Burn Spray
  • Uses: Sunburn, Burns
    Comments: 6 tsp. Aloe Vera Juice
    2 tsp. Comfrey extract
    1 tsp. Chickweed extract
    1 tsp. Calendula extract
    10 drops essential oil of Lavender 
    5 drops essential oil of Tea Tree
    Mix together and pour into a 1 oz. amber, glass bottle. Top the bottle with a spray top and use as needed.

 

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  • Deep Sleep
  • Uses: Restlessness, Insomnia Use: 1 tsp. Valerian tincture
    2 tsp. Passionflower tincture
    2 tsp. Ashwaganda tincture
    1 tsp. Catnip tincture
    1 tsp. Hops tincture
    1 tsp. Chamomile tincture
    1 tsp. Spearmint or Peppermint tincture Use one of these methods. Combine all of these together and store in a 1 oz amber glass bottle. Take 1-2 dropper full in water before bed or throughout the day at 4 hour intervals to promote relaxation and a restful nights sleep.
    Or
    The herbs can also be combined in the same proportions in their dried form. 
    A tea can then be made by steeping 1 tsp. per cup of boiling water.

 

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The Meaning Of Organic

The Trade Practices Act 1974 helps to ensure that products being sold as 'organic' are in fact organic. Severe penalties can apply for selling non-organic produce as organic. 
Generally, when we see something marked as Organic we naturally expect that it is reasonably 'pesticide free' which is often the main concern. Organic, unfortunately does not mean that the produce is any better than non-organic. From our experience, Certifying bodies ensure, by a process of strict bookkeeping, that pesticides and herbicides are not used on their members farms. There does not seem to be any attempt at ensuring that the farmers are actually any good at what they do or that the quality of their produce is of a standard that justifies the increased price tag.